En Gedi: Finding rest in the wilderness!

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Posts Tagged ‘school’

Secular Humanism…the stuff public education is built on!

Posted by Scott on September 8, 2009

*Very good article written about the plight of todays public education system. No wonder is struggles to educate the kids. A godless institution will not be blessed by the God of this universe and its success will always be a dream, but never a reality. 

A side note here:  After a recent testing was done based on the same testing system from public schools, private schools, and homeschoolers the results were astonishing. Homeschool kids ranked in all catagories at about the 85% level. Private School kids ranked at the 81% level. Public School kids ranked at the 50% level. To see the complete article on the Home-School testing result go to Home-Schooling.

Now, read this article written by the Hamilton-Wentworth Family Action Council in Canada:

“If our education system is to be secular, we need to understand what secular means and identify the foundational principles guiding the decisions being made in our education system. How does a secular system co-exist with the values and worldviews of the communities of the larger society that it serves? There are two common types of secularism – ‘secular humanism’ and ‘secular pluralism’.

Secular Humanism

Secular humanism is a secular philosophy based upon humanistic principles. Secular Humanists became a significant force in public education after the original Humanist Manifesto I was published in 1933. John Dewey, ” father of progressive education, ” is reputed to have been the author. Public education often reflects secular humanistic worldview. Secular humanism was founded upon humanistic and atheistic philosophies and is often identified as ‘without religion’. A secular humanistic worldview is based upon the beliefs outlined in the Humanist Manifesto l (1933), Humanist Manifesto ll. (1972), and The Secular Humanist Declaration (1980).

The fundamental proclaimed beliefs are:

-That the nature of the universe, as depicted by science, makes unacceptable any supernatural or cosmic guarantees of human values;

-Morals are rooted in the human experience and that supernatural beliefs are, at best an irrelevant diversion;

-The universe is regarded as self-existing and not created;

-Man is part of nature and has emerged as part of a continuous process (evolution);

-As there is no life after death, man will take the path of mental hygiene and discourage sentimental and unreal hopes and wishful thinking;

-Religious institutions, their ritualistic forms, ecclesiastical methods, and communal activities must be reconstituted as rapidly as possible as experience allows, in order to function effectively in the modern world;

-This is the only life of which we have certain knowledge and we owe it to ourselves and others to make the best life possible for ourselves and all those whom share this fragile planet;

-We find the traditional views of the existence of God either are meaningless, have not yet been demonstrated to be true, or are tyrannically exploitive.

-We reject the divinity of Jesus… Secular Humanism places trust in human intelligence rather than in divine guidance. Humanist Manifesto II

There is a broader task that all those who believe in democratic secular humanist values will recognize, namely the need to embark upon a long-term program of public education and enlightenment concerning the relevance of the secular outlook to the human condition. Further, the Secular Humanist Declaration (1980) states:

” The authors of the first two manifestos declare that humanism is a religion and the manifestos are their ‘theses of religious humanism “.

In other words… their doctrine. The Supreme Court of the United States in Torches vs. Watkins, 1961, upheld the view that secular humanism is a religion. When other religious guidelines (that were used to help us make decisions about curriculum) were removed, the default value system was secular humanism where decisions are made strictly upon rational human thought. If public education is operating, intentionally or by default, upon secular humanistic principles, and this philosophy is singularly imposed upon all families from the various culture and belief systems, it could be legally argued that such a system is discriminatory. This is not inclusive and/or accommodating of people who possess other value systems and worldviews.”

**I will post the new Secular Pluralism article next!

Scott Bailey 2009

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Parents Acting Like Teenagers!

Posted by Scott on November 21, 2007

Dr. Mohler’s Blog

“Freak Dancing” — When Parents Advocate Misbehavior

The Wall Street Journal is out with one of the those eye-opening stories that defies common moral sense. It seems that Jason Ceyanes, the 35-year-old superintendent of schools in Argyle, Texas, decided to crack down on sexually-suggestive dancing at the local high school. But, when the superintendent banned “freak dancing,” he got into trouble with some of Argyle’s parents.

Here is how The Wall Street Journal introduced its account of the controversy:

A new resolve by school officials in this booming Dallas suburb to crack down on sexually suggestive dancing — and skimpy clothing — has sparked a rancorous debate over what boundaries should be set for teenagers’ self-expression. Argyle joins a long list of other schools around the country that have banned the hip-hop inspired dancing known as “grinding” or “freak dancing.”

But in Argyle, a once-sleepy farming community strained by explosive growth from an influx of well-to-do suburbanites, the controversy has gotten vicious. Some parents blame the newly installed school superintendent, Jason Ceyanes, 35, for ruining their children’s October homecoming dance by enforcing a strict dress code and making provocative dancing off-limits. Disgusted, a lot of kids left, and the dance ended early.

Mr. Ceyanes says he fears current cleavage-baring dress styles combined with sexually charged dancing could lead to an unsafe environment for students.

“This is not just shaking your booty,” he said. “This is pelvis-to-pelvis physical contact in the private areas…and then moving around.”

“Freak dancing” is well known throughout the nation, and it involves what can only be described as “sexually charged” physical contact and movement. But many of the kids in Argyle were “disgusted” that freak dancing was banned at the homecoming dance, so they left. That might be fairly easy to understand. After all, adolescents are expected to exhibit adolescent patterns of misbehavior. What makes this story so interesting is that so many parents responded by joining their adolescents in immature response. In fact, their protest of the superintendent’s policy is shocking.

As the paper explained, “Many parents support Mr. Ceyanes’s actions. But another vocal faction has been harshly critical of the new superintendent, creating a deep rift in the community. These parents defend the children of Argyle as ‘good kids,’ and say they should be trusted to dance and dress the way they want.”

Here is one of the moral hallmarks of our confused age. Parents defy authority and propriety and justify the misbehavior of their own children while calling them “good kids.” In this case, they argue that these “good kids” should be allowed “to dance and dress the way they want” — even if that means sexually suggestive dress and sexually charged dancing.

Mr. Ceyanes held a public meeting for parents and played a video of freak dancing. “I cannot imagine that there is a father in this room who could watch this video and be all right with a young man dancing with his daughter in that fashion,” he told the parents.

This is further evidence of a trend long in coming. Fashion styles for adult women now mimic those of adolescent girls. Why? So many moms want to act like teenagers and dress as provocatively as their offspring. Far too many parents want to act like their teenagers’ friends and peers, not like parents. Parents, after all, are expected to act like adults, and this is a society that depreciates adulthood and valorizes adolescence.

When a story like this makes the front page of The Wall Street Journal, something significant has shifted on the moral landscape. When parents demand that their “good kids” be allowed to freak dance at school events, the real story shifts from the kids to the parents.

___________________

The Wall Street Journal also features this video coverage of the story [go here].  We discussed this issue on Tuesday’s edition of The Albert Mohler Program [listen here].

-Scott Bailey 2007

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Older Kids Want to Learn About God, too!

Posted by Scott on November 19, 2007

And For Older Children . . . Respect Their Desire to Read and to Learn

Several readers of these articles and listeners to the radio program responded to the article on Bible story books for young children by asking about a book for older children as well. Thankfully, there is (as several readers pointed out) a wonderful resource in The Child’s Story Bible by Catherine F. Vos.

The Child’s Story Bible goes far beyond the picture book format and will appeal to school-age children. The book is older than virtually all of the parents who will be reading it to their children. The enduring popularity of the book is at least partly due to the fact that Vos did not write in a childish manner, but instead assumed that children will want to learn and that they can handle a substantial story from the Bible — not just a story summary with pictures.

In other words, Vos had the ability to tell the story to children without writing in a condescending manner. The stories are wonderfully written and parents will enjoy reading them as much as children will enjoy hearing them.

Of course, many children will be able to read these stories for themselves — or at least to try. Let your children cut their teeth on this collection of stories from the Bible.

Most children will hear these stories for the first time as a parent or other adult reads to them. This is a truly special time for both parent and child.

Here are a few suggestions for maximizing the reading experience for school-age children.

1. Read at a specific time set as part of the ritual of the child’s life. Children thrive on structure and are motivated by anticipation. Make a special reading time part of the family’s day. The obvious time for this is bedtime, and for good reason. The child senses the end of the day is near, knows sleep is coming, and is more likely to be both calm and attentive.

Furthermore, the child is more likely to anticipate a special time of closeness with Mom or Dad (or both) at bedtime, dressed for bed and gathered with parents to end the day. There is nothing wrong with reading to the child at any hour of the day, but bedtime is undeniably special.

2. Read in a clear voice and avoid both excessive drama and a lifeless reading. A listless and lazy reader will lose the child’s attention, but an excessively dramatic reader will make the child grow accustomed to drama — often at the expense of thoughtful content and retention. You want the child to be fully drawn into the story, but you also want the child to be thinking about the story and its meaning.

3. When reading a Bible story, help the child to find the actual text of the account in the pages of the Bible. The child needs to learn to read the Bible itself — not just Bible story books, and to know that the Bible is God’s perfect and sufficient Word.

4. Place the story in its context within God’s plan and within the Bible. Help children to understand how every word of the Bible is fulfilled in Christ and finds its meaning within God’s plan to redeem His people from sin.

5. Recognize that many of the stories of the Bible teach a clear moral lesson — a lesson that children clearly need to learn and take to heart. At the same time, recognize that these accounts are never merely morality tales. Point your child to the big picture.

6. Never read down to your children, treating them as dull. Instead, give them a substantial story, lay out the narrative, and then trust that they will want to learn and to push themselves toward understanding. Then, be the human agent of that understanding by explaining the story with patience, creativity, and insight based in the fact that you know both the story and the child or children hearing it.

7. Be as honest as the Bible in revealing the strengths and weaknesses of God’s people. Children need to know that God loves us in spite of who we are as sinners, not because of our supposed worth. Children need to learn moral honesty and to know that all (even you, dear parents) are sinners.

8. Ask your children questions about the story to measure understanding, and make sure to see if they have any questions. Ask questions the next morning, during the day, on the playground, in the car, and when the child is in the bathtub. Encourage conversation about the Bible and Bible stories.

9. Ask older children to help with the reading and to grow accustomed both to reading for themselves and to reading aloud.  There is much too little reading of the Bible aloud to the congregation in many churches.  Let the recovery of reading aloud the Word of God begin in your home. 

10. Finally, teach them to pray the Scriptures, talking about the story just read and its biblical text as you pray. Pray that God will apply His Word to their hearts, thank God for His Word and for His love, remind them of Christ and His promises, and entrust them to God for the night and for eternity.

No moment invested in teaching your child the Bible and reading Bible stories is ever wasted time. If your reading of a story is interrupted by circumstances (or by a child who has lost the fight against sleep), just pick it up the next time and move on. Enjoy every moment while your children are at this precious and promising stage of life.

By Dr Albert Mohler Jr.

-Scott Bailey 2007

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Courageous Message for All Americans by Al Mohler Jr.

Posted by Scott on October 19, 2007

Dr. Mohler’s Blog

October 2007

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A Recovery Plan for Black America — And a Courageous Message for All Americans

Bill Cosby worked his way into American hearts through his great talent as a comedian and actor, but there has always been more to Bill Cosby than any laugh line can convey. He is also a man of ideas and a man who cares deeply about his country.

Cosby is also a man who cares deeply about the breakdown of the family and social cohesion among black Americans — especially among young black men and boys. In his new book, Come on, People: On the Path from Victims to Victors [Thomas Nelson], Cosby teams up with Harvard University psychiatrist Alvin F. Poussaint to confront many of these issues head-on. The book is as courageous and it is timely.

“For the last generation or two, as our communities dissolved and our parenting skills broke down, no one has suffered more than our young black men,” Cosby and Poussaint lament. They face the issues honestly and do not mince words. At the same time, they place these challenges within the context of what they also see as continuing prejudice against black Americans. The essence of their argument is that while black America can blame others for many of the challenges they face, they hold the key to their own recovery through personal and group achievement and responsibility.

Consider a paragraph like this:

We are calling on men, all men, the successful and the unsuccessful, the affluent and the poor, the married and the unmarried, to come and claim their children. You can run the biggest drug cartel in America or win the Super Bowl, but if you haven’t claimed your children, you are not a man. You can make all the excuses you want, but no one can stop you from claiming your children. It’s not about you. It’s about them. If you have not come to claim your children, you have stolen their hope. You have stolen any kind of feeling that they are worth something. They will likely have no sense of the past, little pride, and even less faith in the future. They will see fathers at the mall or on TV and they will wonder how stupid or ugly they must be to have driven their fathers away.

The authors lament the breakdown of marriage and fatherhood most of all, tracing most of the pathologies they cite to that cause.  They also note that even under the worst oppression by others, black Americans had held their families together or had done their very best to do so.  These pathologies are now self-inflicted.

This paragraph should haunt all Americans:

There is one statistic that captures the bleakness.  In 1950, five out of every six black children were born into a two-parent home.  Today, that number is less than two out of six.  In poor communities, that number is lower still.  There are whole blocks with scarcely a married couple, whole blocks without responsible males to watch out for wayward boys, whole neighborhoods in which little girls and boys come of age without seeing up close a committed partnership and perhaps never having attended a wedding.

Just think about that — whole blocks of children growing up without ever seeing a married couple up close or having attended a wedding.  The problem can be traced to the breakdown of marriage and the absence of fathers, they argue.  In their words, “Parenting works best when both a mother and father participate. Some mothers can do it on their own, but they need help. A house without a father is a challenge. A neighborhood without fathers is a catastrophe, and that’s just about what we have today.”

Bill Cosby has raised these issues before, but never with a presentation and articulation as forceful and comprehensive as Come On, People.  Christians will want to take many of the arguments beyond where Cosby and Poussaint leave them, but all will recognize the courage represented by this brave book.

Here, for example, is a passage in which the authors deal with the shift in young male sexual behavior and its consequences:

As we became older and grew more interested in girls, our hormones raged just as boys’ hormones rage today. The Internet may be new. Cell phones may be new. But sex, we don’t need to tell you, has been around since Adam and Eve. So has shame. We knew that if one of us got a girl pregnant, not only would she have to visit that famous “aunt in South Carolina,” but young Romeo would have to go too, not to South Carolina maybe, but somewhere. It would be too embarrassing for Romeo’s family for him to just sit around in the neighborhood with a fat Cheshire cat smile on his face.

 

 

And there was something else we understood: that girl likely had a daddy in the home. And he’d be prepared to wipe that grin off Romeo’s face permanently. This was what parenting was about. It wasn’t always pretty, but it could be pretty effective.

 

More:

 

For no good reason we can understand, society seems to be telling young black men that fatherhood is no big thing. Society tells young people in general to look after number one and to worry about everyone else later, if at all. Like the sixteen-year-old on the TV show—if you don’t like the outcome, walk away. Even if you get married and you’re not happy, walk away. With all the temptations to walk away, the black divorce and separation rate today is 50 percent higher than the white rate. And black women who divorce are considerably less likely to remarry than white divorcees, partly because of the shortage of black males.

 

 

Without being told and told often, young men simply do not know or understand what a father’s responsibilities are. Many of them have never seen a real father in action. Many do not appreciate that fathers are important to a child’s healthy development or that unemployed, separated, and unwed fathers can still interact with their children and contribute significantly to their well-being.

 

The issues Cosby and Poussaint address are important to all Americans, and every American has a personal stake in the recovery these authors hope to encourage.

 

___________________

 

Many people who enjoy and appreciate Bill Cosby do not know that he holds both Masters of Education and Doctor of Education degrees from the University of Massachusetts.  His doctoral dissertation was entitled, “The Integration of Visual Media via Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids into the Elementary Schools Culminating as a Teacher Aid to Achieve Increased Learning” (1977).

 

Cosby has his critics within the African-American community, notably Michael Eric Dyson of Georgetown University.  In his book, Is Bill Cosby Right?, Dyson argues that Cosby blames black Americans for problems caused by others and rejects Cosby’s proposals for recovery. 

 

-Scott Bailey 2007

 

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Parental Rights in Education…by Al Mohler Jr.

Posted by Scott on October 18, 2007

Parental Rights in Education — Constant Vigilance Needed

Who makes the crucial decisions about the education of your children? The rights of parents to make these essential decisions must be asserted and defended in every generation. There are others who would wish to make those decisions concerning your children.

Jeff Jacoby of The Boston Globe begins a recent column with these words, drawn from a national party platform:

“Freedom of education, being an essential of civil and religious liberty . . . must not be interfered with under any pretext whatever. . . . We are opposed to state interference with parental rights and rights of conscience in the education of children as an infringement of the fundamental . . . doctrine that the largest individual liberty consistent with the rights of others insures the highest type of American citizenship and the best government.”

Those impressive words are taken from a resolution adopted by the 1892 Democratic National Convention. Can you imagine the Democratic Party adopting similar language today? Not hardly.

In the years since 1892, teacher unions have grown in membership and influence, now representing one of the most powerful political forces in Washington and state capitals. The teacher unions and the educational establishment continually press for more government control of education and against innovations such as charter schools. Both national parties are, at least in part, captive to the educational establishment. The teacher unions are one of the most powerful forces within the Democratic Party, but the educational bureaucracies also hold at least some sway over Republicans. President Ronald Reagan ran for office in 1980 calling for the abolition of the U.S. Department of Education. Nevertheless, even after the so-called “Reagan Revolution,” the department grew larger than ever.

With reference to the 2008 race for the presidency, Jacoby notes:

Today, on education as on so much else, the Democrats sing from a different hymnal. When the party’s presidential candidates debated at Dartmouth College recently, they were asked about a controversial incident in Lexington, Mass., where a second-grade teacher, to the dismay of several parents, had read her young students a story celebrating same-sex marriage. Were the candidates “comfortable” with that?

“Yes, absolutely,” former senator John Edwards promptly replied. “I want my children . . . to be exposed to all the information . . . even in second grade . . . because I don’t want to impose my view. Nobody made me God. I don’t get to decide on behalf of my family or my children. . . . I don’t get to impose on them what it is that I believe is right.” None of the other candidates disagreed, even though most of them say they oppose same-sex marriage.

Then:

Thus in a little over 100 years, the Democratic Party – and much of the Republican Party – has been transformed from a champion of “parental rights and rights of conscience in the education of children” to a party whose leaders believe that parents “don’t get to impose” their views and values on what their kids are taught in school. Do American parents see anything wrong with that? Apparently not: The majority of them dutifully enroll their children in government-operated schools, where the only views and values permitted are the ones prescribed by the state.

As Jacoby rightly observes, no one would want government to control 90% of housing or 90% of entertainment, but the government does control 90% of primary and secondary education.  Furthermore, most parents seem unconcerned about this. 

Jacoby responds:

But we should be concerned. Not just because the quality of government schooling is so often poor or its costs so high. Not just because public schools are constantly roiled by political storms. Not just because schools backed by the power of the state are not accountable to parents and can ride roughshod over their concerns. And not just because the public-school monopoly, like most monopolies, resists change, innovation, and excellence.

In several states, forces including the teacher unions are pushing for universal preschool programs reaching down as young as 3-year-olds.  Most of the candidates running for the Democratic presidential nomination are fully supportive of these proposals. The government will, if allowed, extend its reach and control into younger and younger ages — and will include additional millions and millions of children.

Parents do have choices, and parental choice in education is a necessary precondition for a free society.  Beyond this, parents bear a responsibility before God to make wise and responsible decisions concerning the education of their children.  Indeed, parents cannot evade this responsibility.

Jeff Jacoby’s column is a timely reminder of the fact that the rights of parents must be protected in every generation.  Otherwise, other forces with other agendas will run roughshod over the convictions and worldviews of parents.  It is happening all around us even now.

________________________

READ ON:  Evidence of the governmental subversion of parental rights over children in public schools comes just last night as a Maine school district voted to provide contraceptives to students ages 11-13 in a Portland-area middle school — without parental notification.  As The Associated Press reported late on Wednesday:

Pupils at a city middle school will be able to get birth control pills and patches at their student health center after the local school board approved the proposal Wednesday evening.

The plan, offered by city health officials, makes King Middle School the first middle school in Maine to make a full range of contraception available to students in grades 6 through 8, according to the state Department of Health and Human Services.

Further:

At King Middle School, birth control prescriptions will be given after a student undergoes a physical exam by a physician or nurse practitioner, said Lisa Belanger, who oversees Portland’s student health centers.

Students treated at the centers must first get written parental permission, but under state law such treatment is confidential, and students decide for themselves whether to tell their parents about the services they receive.

This is a post by Al Mohler Jr. 10-18-2007  visit his site at www.AlbertMohler.com

-Scott Bailey 2007

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-Waiting Instruction…Boys!

Posted by Scott on October 15, 2007

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“In 1800, President Thomas Jefferson commissioned a national survey conducted by Dupont de Numours to determine the status of literacy in America.  The results were phenomenal.  Better than ninety-seven percent of American citizens could read and write.  The stated reason for this success was  that, from Boston to Atlanta, American fathers practiced daily Bible reading with their children around the breakfast table.  Long before the creation of government schools (public schools) or the National Education Association, faithful fathers proved that the simple act of teaching the Holy Scriptures to their children at home would lead our nation to become the most literate in the world.”   

-Quote by Doug Phillips, Esq. publisher taken from the book

“The Bible Lessons of John Quincy Adams for His Sons”

The title “Awaiting Instruction…Boys!” is not a story with a twist.  Guys, it is reality.  Our boys are waiting for their dads instruction on life.  They want to know how to be a real man.  They really want to know our imput on dating,  girls, bullies, sports, God, the Bible, making money, working, pain, family, friends, our boyhood, family history, who we admire, our heroes, places we have been, and so on.  The boys are starving to have the proper instructions on what we call “life”.  Of course they may not react as though they care, but inside they are spell bound to every word.  For one, it is a conversation with dad which in most homes that is rare these days.  Most importantly, we need to help fill their minds and hearts with God’s truth.  If we can do nothing more, speak God’s word into their ears whether they seem to be listening or not will be enough.

 

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Something I struggle with and sense that many other dads struggle with as well is finding that time during our day to spend with each child.  It is tough, but something we must work hard to do.  I am still trying to work through that issue.  What I have found is taking the time whenever possible to ask them questions and listen to their answers.  This usually occurs in the strangest places.  In the car, working in the flower beds, mowing the yard, setting on our bed “shooting the breeze “, at my office on the days I take one of the kids with me and many other opportunities.  Sometimes you have several minutes to an hour of opportunity for a healthy discussion and other times is may only be a few minutes….in either case the time is invaluable.  As I now have four teenagers, one preteen, two nearly to the preteen stage, two toddlers, and a baby, I find each moment I can get with them is precious time.  It seems like only yesterday my oldest was trying to walk and now she has her driving permit and I am sweating this driving thing out with her.  With her I have interesting conversation while I am driving with her.  My others we catch a moment anytime we can.  If I am going to the store I will select one of the kids to take with me alone.  This way they have my undivided attention.  I will ask them what they have been doing, thinking about, books they are reading, their friends, etc.  You might ask what the  kids think about only one getting to go with dad?  Well, they each have to understand that I am only one daddy and each of the kids must wait their turn.  This works well with them because each of them know their turn is coming.  I did not say it was a perfect system, but for now it is an efficient one.

For sometime now I have also been trying to figure a way to slow down our lives enough to actually eat one meal a day as a family….altogether.  To this day it is still in the works, but as long as we keep working on it we will figure it out…we might have to make it one time per week to start with, but we are going to work it out.

Guys, these are just a few suggestions from my experiences.  Each day my goal is to improve on what I can and try not to stress out over what I cannot improve on today.  You have different schedules and different jobs from me possibly, but God wants our attention and He wants us to give our boys the attention they deserve.  These sons of ours are waiting for our instructions.  Read the bible to them daily…quote scripture to them as much as possible.  This is the type of instructions our boys need.  Tell them how your God is a providential God with a plan for their lives.  Teach them that His plan for them is the greatest plan they could ever imagine.  Express to them that God is all knowing, all powerful, all loving merciful, judging, forgiving, and gracious.  You might tell them stories about how the Israelites left Egypt for the promised land and found themselves facing the Red Sea to the front, Pharaoh’s army behind and desert mountains on the sides.  With their backs to wall so to speak God provided the way out and it was the most unlikely answer to their prayers.  You can tell them stories of God’s providential power in your own lives or the lives of family or people you know.  Contrary to popular belief these kids do not have to rebel if we will instruct them properly now.  Stories about how God provided for George Mueller’s orphanages in England…he never ask a person for anything.  George Mueller always asked God for the provision as He willed and God always without fail provided.  These are the kinds of stories and instruction these guys are looking for.  As my wife and I strive to instruct our children I hope you will pray for success in that and our prayer will be that your family is blessed with success as you strive to instruct your children, especially those boys.  Think of that young lady that God has planned for your son…she would like a young man that has been properly instructed rather than someone with no direction and no way to get direction.

“I advise you. my son, in whatever you read, and most of all in reading the Bible, to remember that it is for the purpose of making you wiser and more virtuus.”

-John Quincy Adams

Awaiting Instruction is our opportunity as dads to give it to our boys straight in the truth of God’s Holy Word.

-Scott Bailey (c) 2007

 

 

 

 

 

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